Contribute

Interested in contributing a guest post to Studying Research? I would love to hear from you! Below are some guidelines to get you started. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.

General

Studying Research is a personal blog by Allison Hosier, an Information Literacy Librarian at the University at Albany. The goal of this blog is in part to further elaborate on ideas originally put forth in the article “Research is an Activity and a Subject of Study” as well as start a conversation about the study of research. The content of this blog is not peer-reviewed.

Proposals

Studying Research is currently seeking guest posts from researchers who study research or who use ideas related to the study of research in their teaching.

If you are someone who studies or teaches research and would like to contribute a guest post to Studying Research, please fill out this proposal form with details about your idea.

(If you are an author I’ve contacted directly, there is no need to submit a proposal. Chances are, you’re looking at this because I sent it to you in the hopes that it would convince you I’m not some random weirdo!)

Definitions

For the purposes of this blog, “research” is defined broadly as any formal or informal investigation undertaken to gather information in order to fill a gap in knowledge, build on existing knowledge, or create new knowledge. Research can take place in a variety of contexts, including but not limited to academic, scholarly, professional, personal, and creative ones. A more detailed definition can be found in “Research is an Activity and a Subject of Study.”

The study of research is any research which examines the products or processes of research in order to understand something about research itself.

Teaching the study of research involves taking research instruction beyond the application of a set of basic skills. It may also incorporate the contextual nature of research. A suggested model for teaching the study of research is discussed in “Research is an Activity and a Subject of Study” but teaching the study of research can take many forms.

Content and format

There are a number of options for the content and format of your guest post. Choose the one that works best for you.

Option 1: Things I learned

The first option is to write your post as a list of 3-5 things you learned as part of your most recent project. These can be anything that you feel is worth sharing.

Possible ideas for writing about the study of research:

  • Major findings or takeaways
  • Something you learned about the research process
  • Something you learned about the writing process
  • Something you learned about the publication/presentation/sharing process
  • General wisdom

If you would like to see an example of this type of post, check out my post on “Things I Learned Writing ‘Research is An Activity and a Subject of Study.’”

Possible ideas for writing about teaching research:

  • Major findings or takeaways
  • Lessons learned
  • Changes for next time
  • General wisdom

The inspiration for this option comes from Chuck Wendig’s Terrible Minds blog, which features guest posts by fiction writers. Here are some examples (warning for possible rude language): http://terribleminds.com/ramble/?s=five+things

Option 2: Guest interview

The second option is a guest interview. For this, I’ll send you a list of questions.

For those who want to talk about studying research:

  • Share a little bit about your research project.
  • What led you to this particular research path?
  • What are some of the main takeaways from your project so far?
  • What is your favorite thing you have learned so far?
  • What are you hoping to learn from future research?

For those who want to talk about teaching:

  • Share a little bit about your teaching and how you use the study of research as part of your teaching.
  • What led you to this teaching path?
  • What has gone well with using the study of research as part of your teaching?
  • What challenges have you faced?
  • What advice would you give someone who wants to use this as part of their own teaching?
  • Where are you hoping to take this in the future?

You’ll write your answers to these questions and send them back to me.

P.S. These lists are highly negotiable. If you would like any changes, please let me know.

Option 3: Make a suggestion

If you would like to write a guest post but neither of the above options appeals to you, please feel free to propose an alternative using the proposal form.

Length

There are currently no hard word limits for any type of guest post. Aim for about 1000-1500 words.

Tone

The tone if the blog is relatively informal (kind of like this guide!). This is a conversation rather than a formal report of research. Keep things casual and light but generally professional, as you might when giving a presentation to colleagues at a conference.

Pronouns

When writing about other people, please use their preferred pronouns when known. For general singular personal pronouns please use the singular “they” and “their” (or rephrase so as to not use a singular pronoun).

Audience

Write for an audience who has some knowledge of your topic but is looking to learn more and may need occasional reminders about the background behind certain concepts or the definitions of terms.

Citations

Citations are not required. Contextual links within the text of the post are the preferred method for referring to outside sources. However, if you would like to include citations, please feel free to use the citation style of your choice as long as you are consistent throughout your piece. Keep in mind that you will be responsible for the accuracy of the citation information and format.

Process

Please submit a proposal using the proposal form.

For “Things I Learned” posts:

  • Any proposals will receive a response within one business week.
  • For accepted proposals, an initial deadline of about one month will be given for a first draft. This deadline is flexible.
  • Completed drafts should be submitted through e-mail, attached as a Word document. Please include the Creative Commons license you would like to use for your work if you prefer something other than the CC BY 4.0 license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) that is used for most of the blog’s content.
  • Once I receive your draft, I will respond to let you know approximately when to expect feedback. I will then review your work and provide comments before returning it for any needed revisions.
  • We’ll keep this going until we agree the post is ready to go.
  • Once the post is ready, I’ll send you an anticipated date of publication.

For “Guest Interview” posts:

  • Any proposals will receive a response with one business week.
  • For accepted proposals, I will send you a list of standard questions (see above under “Content and Format”). These questions are negotiable, within reason. You will be given an initial deadline to submit any changes to the questions. I will review any suggested changes.
  • Once the list of questions is agreed on, you will be given an initial deadline of about one month for a first draft of your answers to the questions. This deadline is flexible.
  • Completed drafts should be submitted through e-mail, attached as a Word document. Please include the Creative Commons license you would like to use for your work if you prefer something other than the CC BY 4.0 license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) that is used for most of the blog’s content.
  • Once I receive your draft, I will respond to let you know approximately when to expect feedback. I will then review your work and provide comments before returning it for any needed revisions. Your responses may be edited for length or clarity.
  • We’ll keep this going until we agree the post is ready to go.
  • Once the post is ready, I’ll send you an anticipated date of publication.

For “Make a suggestion” proposals:

  • Any proposals will receive a response within one business week. Suggestions for changes may be made.
  • Once the content and format of the post is agreed on, an initial deadline of about one month will be given for a first draft. This deadline is flexible.
  • Completed drafts should be submitted through e-mail, attached as a Word document. Please include the Creative Commons license you would like to use for your work if you prefer something other than the CC BY 4.0 license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) that is used for most of the blog’s content.
  • Once I receive your draft, I will respond to let you know approximately when to expect feedback. I will then review your work and provide comments before returning it for any needed revisions.
  • We’ll keep this going until we agree the post is ready to go.
  • Once the post is ready, I’ll send you an anticipated date of publication.

Bio(s)

Please include a brief bio of all authors to be included as part of the post, written in the third person. This bio will be used to introduce your post and give context to the project you’re describing. Include information about where a reader can find out more about your work. This can be a link to a relevant published article or online presentation/project materials, information about a forthcoming publication or presentation, a link to your blog or other online presence, an e-mail address, etc.

Images

Feel free to choose a featured image for your post. Make sure that it is one you have permission to use and please include credit for the image’s original creator. If you don’t choose an image, one will be chosen from Pixabay.

Giving Credit

As part of your post, please be sure to give credit to any co-authors or colleagues who contributed to your publication or project even if they are not co-authoring the blog post with you. This can be as simple as mentioning their names somewhere in the text of your post. It will generally be assumed that any blog post you write has the approval of any original co-authors.

Compensation

Unfortunately, compensation cannot be offered for guest posts at this time.

Creative Commons

A CC BY 4.0 license is being used for all content on Studying Research (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). If you would prefer a different license for your post, please include that with your draft.

Questions?

Please feel free to contact me.

 

These guidelines are adapted from those created by the editors of In the Library with the Lead Pipe.