ACRL Questions: Talking to faculty about the contextual nature of research

Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

This is a new post in an ongoing series where I’m answering questions that came up during my ACRL presentation “Research is Not a Basic Skill.” Previous posts discussed student proficiency versus student confidence, models for teaching the contextual nature of research, why we’re talking in terms of “research” instead of “information literacy,” and the relationship between some of these ideas and critical information literacy.

Today I’m going to spend some time on talking to faculty about the contextual nature of research.

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Questions from ACRL: Critical information literacy and genres of research

Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

This is a new post in an ongoing series where I’m answering questions that came up during my ACRL presentation “Research is Not a Basic Skill.” Previous posts discussed student proficiency versus student confidence, models for teaching the contextual nature of research, and the difference between “research” and “information literacy.”

One of the harder questions I got was when someone asked me to clarify the tension I saw between critical information literacy and the idea of teaching genres of research. I stumbled a bit in the moment, so let me see if I can provide a clearer answer here.

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Questions from ACRL: Information literacy or research?

Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

This is a new post in an ongoing series where I’m answering questions that came up during my ACRL presentation “Research is Not a Basic Skill.” Previous posts discussed student proficiency versus student confidence and models for teaching the contextual nature of research.

Here, I’m going to address a question about why I’d chosen the term “research” rather than “information literacy” to frame my discussion.

To answer this, let me begin with a story.

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ACRL Questions: Models of teaching the contextual nature of research

Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

This is a new post in an ongoing series where I’m answering questions that came up during my ACRL presentation “Research is Not a Basic Skill.” Previously, I addressed a great question I got about student overconfidence. 

In addition to that, there were a couple of questions related to models for teaching the contextual nature of research. I answered them as best I could in the moment, but wanted to share some further thoughts.

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Questions from ACRL: Student proficiency versus student confidence

Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

Last month, I did a webcast for the ACRL virtual conference called “Research is Not a Basic Skill.” It was a great experience (and a great conference!). There were some really interesting questions during the Q&A part of the presentation and I wanted to take some space here to answer some of them a little more fully now that I’ve had some more time to think about them.

So this is the first in what will probably be a series of entries addressing some of the questions I got, starting with one about student proficiency versus student confidence.

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